Urawusi Warning

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Urawusi, also known as bearberry, is a traditional folk medicine that has been used by Native Americans for hundreds of years, mainly for bladder and urinary tract infections. In a short time, low doses of uva-ursi preparations are generally considered safe. However, at higher doses, urauri may be toxic and lead to liver damage. Consult your doctor and professional herbalist or physiotherapist before taking urauri in any form.

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span= "article-image inner caption-class"> Urawusi plant. UVA Ursi is an evergreen shrub native to alpine forests in North America, Europe, Siberia and the Himalayas. The small sour red berries produced in Urawusi are the favorite of many bear species, which also explains its nickname. However, these berries are not medicinal; on the contrary, the leaves of Uwa bear shrubs are the main ingredients of herbal preparations. Leaves are usually crushed into fine powder and put into capsules, but leaves can also be soaked in hot water to make herbal infusion. The medicinal value of

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According to the principle and practice of Phytotherapy: Modern Herbs, the leaves of Urawuxi shrubs contain a variety of phytochemicals with antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, especially arbutin and hydroquinone. The properties of selenium help to resist infection and reduce tissue damage. They explain why traditional therapists use urauri to treat bladder and urinary tract infections. Urawuxiye also contains tannins, which are strongly astringent and help reduce inflammation. Before making any recommendations, the impact of urauri on patients with genitourinary tract infections needs to be properly studied.

Warning: According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, hydroquinone, a component of arbutin (uva ursi) leaves, is toxic at high doses and can cause severe liver damage. Therefore, urauri can only be taken in a short time of not more than five days, and not more than five times a year alone. It is recommended that adult doses be 2 to 5 mg of hay per day for 5 days. Under no circumstances should children be injected with uraus. Other patients who should not take urauri include pregnant or lactating women, hypertension, Crohn's disease, gastric ulcer, digestive system disease, kidney disease or liver disease. The side effects of

ingestion of Staphylococcus Ursi were generally mild, including nausea, vomiting, irritability and insomnia. Symptoms of liver damage include yellowing of the skin and eyes, a disease called jaundice, and elevated liver enzymes detected by blood tests. If you have any adverse reactions after taking urauri, please contact your doctor.

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